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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. marcia coyle recaps today's court arguments as the legal world asks, can a gene be patented. >> brown: we get an update on the senate's move toward bipartisan immigration reform with republican senator marco rubio leading the charge this weekend. >> ifill: ray suarez looks at venezuela's contentious presidential election as the opponent asks for a recount. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: 27 runners and thousands more spectators had turned out for the boston marathon today when terror erupted. two bombs exploded, and authorities said two people were killed and more than 50 others were wounded. (sirens). within minutes of the bla
be patented? we turn to marcia coyle who is back with us tonight. she was in the courtroom today. marcia, first background on this case. >> myriad is a utah-based genetic research company. and myriad holds patents on two genes with mutations that are linked to a very high risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer. its patents also give it exclusive control over diagnostic testing for those genes. about four years ago, a group of scientists, researchers, civil rights organizations, women's health organizations decided to challenge myriad's patents in federal court. they filed a lawsuit. they lost. two lower courts have upheld myriad's patents. today the challengers brought the case to the supreme court. >> brown: so the legal issue here is what can be patented. now we made a graphic of patent law just to help you out here. we'll put that up. tell us what the law says. then we can go into this case. >> okay. the law says that you can get a patent for any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, and composition of matter or any new and useful improvements on that invention. but what you can
of a federal law intended to protect native american families. marcia coyle recaps today's arguments. >> ifill: and a new bipartisan report finds that after 9/11, the u.s. "engaged in the practice of torture" with detainees. we talk with two of the authors. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the investigation of the boston marathon bombings ramped up today, as police and federal agents pored over the crime scene. three people are dead, including an eight-year-old boy, and more than 170 others were injured. a handful of those remain in critical condition at various boston hospi
out to wish margaret thatcher a fond farewell, others to bid her good riddance. >> brown: marcia coyle has analysis of today's unanimous ruling from the supreme court that blocks human rights cases abroad from being tried in the u.s. >> ifill: and judy woodruff talks to the author of the new book "clean," about his deep dive into the myths and realities of drug addiction. >> it's seen as a choice: "if you're having problems in your life because you're using drugs or you're drinking, stop." well, people who are addicted would stop, if they could. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the campaign for new curbs on guns ran into senate opposition today that it could not overcome. 41 republicans joined with five democrats to kill the proposal that was thought to have the best chan
science, research and genetics in a case that could determine who controls your medical care. marcia coyle recaps today's court arguments as the legal world asks, can a gene be patented. >> brown: we get an update on the senate's move toward bipartisan immigration reform with republican senator marco rubio leading the charge this weekend. >> ifill: ray suarez looks at venezuela's contentious presidential election as the opponent asks for a recount. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.
. >> brown: marcia coyle has analysis of today's unanimous ruling from the supreme court that blocks human rights cases abroad from being tried in the u.s. >> ifill: and judy woodruff talks to the author of the new book "clean," about his deep dive into the myths and realities of drug addiction. >> it's seen as a choice: "if you're having problems in your life because you're using drugs or you're drinking, stop." well, people who are addicted would stop, if they could. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the campaign for new curbs on guns ran into senate opposition today that it could not overcome. 41 republicans joined with five democrats to kill the proposal that was thought to have the best chance of passing. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our cove
indian children aren't unnecessarily removed from their ethnic origins. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. marcia, when people hear "custody battle" they tend to think mother versus father but this was kind of a three or even four-way legal argument, wasn't it? >> absolutely, ray. you had the lawyer for the adoptive couple here who had custody of the child for about 27 months. you had the lawyer for the guardian add litem for the child and then on the other side you had a lawyer for the biological father of the child and a lawyer for the united states arguing. >> suarez: so why was the indian welfare act -- child welfare act passed in the first place and does the biological father clearly fall under its provisions? >> the act was passed in response to a real crisis. it's estimated that roughly 35% of indian children were being removed from indian families by abusive child welfare agencies and being placed in -- either in adoptive homes or in foster care and generally non-indian foster care or adoptive homes. so congre
.s. corporations in human rights disputes. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" joins me with more. start by explaining the parameters of this case. we talked about it briefly some time ago. >> this started actualry in 2002, 12 nigerian nationals brought a lawsuit in federal court here in the united states against three oil companies. they claimed that the oil company had enlisted the aid of the nigerian military to suppress opposition to the oil company's drilling in a region in nigeria called the ogoni region. and the military had used torture, executions, and arbitrary detentions to do that. and they brought their lawsuit under a 1789 federal law called the alien tort statute, probably one of the oldest laws on the books in the united states. it was enacted by the first congress of the united states. >> ifill: what was that designed to do? >> well, it's-- there's some debate as to really what its purpose was, but the statute is very simple. it has one sentence that says federal courts have jurisdiction when aliens bring claims for basically injuries caused by violations of internationa
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)